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<h2 class="title"><a name="installedcomponents" id=
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Components</h2>
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<p>The NVIDIA Accelerated Linux Graphics Driver consists of the
following components (filenames in parentheses are the full names
of the components after installation). Some paths may be different
on different systems (e.g., X modules may be installed in
/usr/X11R6/ rather than /usr/lib/xorg/).</p>
<div class="itemizedlist">
<ul type="disc">
<li>
<p>An X driver (<code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/xorg/modules/drivers/nvidia_drv.so</code>);
this driver is needed by the X server to use your NVIDIA
hardware.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>A GLX extension module for X (<code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/xorg/modules/extensions/libglx.so.367.57</code>);
this module is used by the X server to provide server-side GLX
support.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>An X module for wrapped software rendering (<code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/xorg/modules/libnvidia-wfb.so.367.57</code>
and optionally, <code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/xorg/modules/libwfb.so</code>); this module is
used by the X driver to perform software rendering on GeForce 8
series GPUs. If <code class="filename">libwfb.so</code> already
exists, nvidia-installer will not overwrite it. Otherwise, it will
create a symbolic link from <code class="filename">libwfb.so</code>
to <code class="filename">libnvidia-wfb.so.367.57</code>.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>EGL and OpenGL ES libraries ( <code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/libEGL.so.1</code>, <code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/libGLESv1_CM.so.367.57</code>, and
<code class="filename">/usr/lib/libGLESv2.so.367.57</code> );
these libraries provide the API entry points for all OpenGL ES and
EGL function calls. They are loaded at run-time by
applications.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>Vendor neutral graphics libraries provided by libglvnd
(<code class="filename">/usr/lib/libOpenGL.so.0</code>,
<code class="filename">/usr/lib/libGLX.so.0</code>, and
<code class="filename">/usr/lib/libGLdispatch.so.0</code>); these
libraries are currently used to provide full OpenGL dispatching
support to NVIDIA's implementation of EGL.</p>
<p>Source code for libglvnd is available at <a href=
"https://github.com/NVIDIA/libglvnd" target=
"_top">https://github.com/NVIDIA/libglvnd</a></p>
</li>
<li>
<p>GLVND vendor implementation libraries for GLX (<code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/libGLX_nvidia.so.0</code>) and EGL
(<code class="filename">/usr/lib/libEGL_nvidia.so.0</code>); these
libraries provide NVIDIA implementations of OpenGL functionality
which may be accessed using the GLVND client-facing libraries.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>A GLX client library and Vulkan ICD (<code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/libGL.so.1</code>), either as part of the GLVND
infrastructure, or a legacy, non-GLVND GLX client library. This
library provides API entry points for all GLX function calls, and
is loaded at run-time by applications. Users may choose one or the
other at installation time by using either the <code class=
"option">--glvnd-glx-client</code> or the <code class=
"option">--no-glvnd-glx-client</code> command line option to
<span><strong class="command">nvidia-installer</strong></span>.</p>
<p>Note that although both the GLVND and non-GLVND GLX client
libraries share the same SONAME of libGL.so.1, only one of them at
a time may be installed at a time. <code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/libGL.so.367.57</code> is the non-GLVND
GLX client library, and <code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/libGL.so.1.0.0</code> is the GLVND GLX client
library.</p>
<p>This library is also used as the Vulkan ICD. Its configuration
file is installed as <code class=
"filename">/etc/vulkan/icd.d/nvidia_icd.json</code>.</p>
<p>Repackagers of the driver are encouraged to provide the
GLVND-based driver stack to promote adoption of the new
infrastructure, but those who choose to package the legacy GLX
client library instead of, or as an alternative to, the GLVND GLX
client library should be aware that the NVIDIA EGL driver depends
upon GLVND for proper functionality. The legacy GLX client library
may coexist with most GLVND libraries, with the exception of
<code class="filename">libGL.so.1</code> and <code class=
"filename">libGLX.so.0</code>, so it is possible to support both
NVIDIA EGL and legacy, non-GLVND NVIDIA GLX by installing all of
the GLVND libraries except for libGL and libGLX alongside the
legacy libGL.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>Various libraries that are used internally by other driver
components. These include <code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/libnvidia-cfg.so.367.57</code>,
<code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/libnvidia-compiler.so.367.57</code>,
<code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/libnvidia-eglcore.so.367.57</code>,
<code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/libnvidia-glcore.so.367.57</code>, and
<code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/libnvidia-glsi.so.367.57</code>.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>A VDPAU (Video Decode and Presentation API for Unix-like
systems) library for the NVIDIA vendor implementation,
(<code class="filename">/usr/lib/vdpau/libvdpau_nvidia.so.367.57</code>);
see <a href="vdpausupport.html" title=
"Appendix&nbsp;G.&nbsp;VDPAU Support">Appendix&nbsp;G, <i>VDPAU
Support</i></a> for details.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>The CUDA library (<code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/libcuda.so.367.57</code>) which provides
runtime support for CUDA (high-performance computing on the GPU)
applications.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>The Fatbinary Loader library (<code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/libnvidia-fatbinaryloader.so.367.57</code>)
provides support for the CUDA driver to work with CUDA fatbinaries.
Fatbinary is a container format which can package multiple PTX and
Cubin files compiled for different SM architectures.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>The PTX JIT Compiler library (<code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/libnvidia-ptxjitcompiler.so.367.57</code>)
is a JIT compiler which compiles PTX into GPU machine code and is
used by the CUDA driver.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>Two OpenCL libraries (<code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/libOpenCL.so.1.0.0</code>, <code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/libnvidia-opencl.so.367.57</code>); the
former is a vendor-independent Installable Client Driver (ICD)
loader, and the latter is the NVIDIA Vendor ICD. A config file
<code class="filename">/etc/OpenCL/vendors/nvidia.icd</code> is
also installed, to advertise the NVIDIA Vendor ICD to the ICD
Loader.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>The <code class="filename">nvidia-cuda-mps-control</code> and
<code class="filename">nvidia-cuda-mps-server</code> applications,
which allow MPI processes to run concurrently on a single GPU.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>A kernel module (<code class="filename">/lib/modules/`uname
-r`/kernel/drivers/video/nvidia-modeset.ko</code>); this kernel
module is responsible for programming the display engine of the
GPU. User-mode NVIDIA driver components such as the NVIDIA X
driver, OpenGL driver, and VDPAU driver communicate with
nvidia-modeset.ko through the /dev/nvidia-modeset device file.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>A kernel module (<code class="filename">/lib/modules/`uname
-r`/kernel/drivers/video/nvidia.ko</code>); this kernel module
provides low-level access to your NVIDIA hardware for all of the
above components. It is generally loaded into the kernel when the X
server is started, and is used by the X driver and OpenGL.
nvidia.ko consists of two pieces: the binary-only core, and a
kernel interface that must be compiled specifically for your kernel
version. Note that the Linux kernel does not have a consistent
binary interface like the X server, so it is important that this
kernel interface be matched with the version of the kernel that you
are using. This can either be accomplished by compiling yourself,
or using precompiled binaries provided for the kernels shipped with
some of the more common Linux distributions.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>NVIDIA Unified Memory kernel module (<code class=
"filename">/lib/modules/`uname
-r`/kernel/drivers/video/nvidia-uvm.ko</code>); this kernel module
provides functionality for sharing memory between the CPU and GPU
in CUDA programs. It is generally loaded into the kernel when a
CUDA program is started, and is used by the CUDA driver on
supported platforms.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>The nvidia-tls libraries (<code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/libnvidia-tls.so.367.57</code> and
<code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/tls/libnvidia-tls.so.367.57</code>); these
files provide thread local storage support for the NVIDIA OpenGL
libraries (libGL, libnvidia-glcore, and libglx). Each nvidia-tls
library provides support for a particular thread local storage
model (such as ELF TLS), and the one appropriate for your system
will be loaded at run time.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>The nvidia-ml library (<code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/libnvidia-ml.so.367.57</code>); The NVIDIA
Management Library provides a monitoring and management API. See
<a href="nvidia-ml.html" title=
"Chapter&nbsp;25.&nbsp;The NVIDIA Management Library">Chapter&nbsp;25,
<i>The NVIDIA Management Library</i></a> for more information.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>The application nvidia-installer (<code class=
"filename">/usr/bin/nvidia-installer</code>) is NVIDIA's tool for
installing and updating NVIDIA drivers. See <a href=
"installdriver.html" title=
"Chapter&nbsp;4.&nbsp;Installing the NVIDIA Driver">Chapter&nbsp;4,
<i>Installing the NVIDIA Driver</i></a> for a more thorough
description.</p>
<p>Source code is available at <a href=
"ftp://download.nvidia.com/XFree86/nvidia-installer/" target=
"_top">ftp://download.nvidia.com/XFree86/nvidia-installer/</a>.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>The application nvidia-modprobe (<code class=
"filename">/usr/bin/nvidia-modprobe</code>) is installed as setuid
root and is used to load the NVIDIA kernel module and create the
<code class="filename">/dev/nvidia*</code> device nodes by
processes (such as CUDA applications) that don't run with
sufficient privileges to do those things themselves.</p>
<p>Source code is available at <a href=
"ftp://download.nvidia.com/XFree86/nvidia-modprobe/" target=
"_top">ftp://download.nvidia.com/XFree86/nvidia-modprobe/</a>.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>The application nvidia-xconfig (<code class=
"filename">/usr/bin/nvidia-xconfig</code>) is NVIDIA's tool for
manipulating X server configuration files. See <a href=
"editxconfig.html" title=
"Chapter&nbsp;6.&nbsp;Configuring X for the NVIDIA Driver">Chapter&nbsp;6,
<i>Configuring X for the NVIDIA Driver</i></a> for more
information.</p>
<p>Source code is available at <a href=
"ftp://download.nvidia.com/XFree86/nvidia-xconfig/" target=
"_top">ftp://download.nvidia.com/XFree86/nvidia-xconfig/</a>.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>The application nvidia-settings (<code class=
"filename">/usr/bin/nvidia-settings</code>) is NVIDIA's tool for
dynamic configuration while the X server is running. See <a href=
"nvidiasettings.html" title=
"Chapter&nbsp;23.&nbsp;Using the nvidia-settings Utility">Chapter&nbsp;23,
<i>Using the nvidia-settings Utility</i></a> for more
information.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>The libnvidia-gtk libraries (<code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/libnvidia-gtk2.so.367.57</code> and on
some platforms <code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/libnvidia-gtk3.so.367.57</code>); these
libraries are required to provide the nvidia-settings user
interface.</p>
<p>Source code is available at <a href=
"ftp://download.nvidia.com/XFree86/nvidia-settings/" target=
"_top">ftp://download.nvidia.com/XFree86/nvidia-settings/</a>.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>The application nvidia-smi (<code class=
"filename">/usr/bin/nvidia-smi</code>) is the NVIDIA System
Management Interface for management and monitoring functionality.
See <a href="nvidia-smi.html" title=
"Chapter&nbsp;24.&nbsp;Using the nvidia-smi Utility">Chapter&nbsp;24,
<i>Using the nvidia-smi Utility</i></a> for more information.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>The application nvidia-debugdump (<code class=
"filename">/usr/bin/nvidia-debugdump</code>) is NVIDIA's tool for
collecting internal GPU state. It is normally invoked by the
nvidia-bug-report.sh (<code class=
"filename">/usr/bin/nvidia-bug-report.sh</code>) script. See
<a href="nvidia-debugdump.html" title=
"Chapter&nbsp;26.&nbsp;Using the nvidia-debugdump Utility">Chapter&nbsp;26,
<i>Using the nvidia-debugdump Utility</i></a> for more
information.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>The daemon nvidia-persistenced (<code class=
"filename">/usr/bin/nvidia-persistenced</code>) is the NVIDIA
Persistence Daemon for allowing the NVIDIA kernel module to
maintain persistent state when no other NVIDIA driver components
are running. See <a href="nvidia-persistenced.html" title=
"Chapter&nbsp;27.&nbsp;Using the nvidia-persistenced Utility">Chapter&nbsp;27,
<i>Using the nvidia-persistenced Utility</i></a> for more
information.</p>
<p>Source code is available at <a href=
"ftp://download.nvidia.com/XFree86/nvidia-persistenced/" target=
"_top">ftp://download.nvidia.com/XFree86/nvidia-persistenced/</a>.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>The NVCUVID library (<code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/libnvcuvid.so.367.57</code>); The NVIDIA
CUDA Video Decoder (NVCUVID) library provides an interface to
hardware video decoding capabilities on NVIDIA GPUs with CUDA.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>The NvEncodeAPI library (<code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/libnvidia-encode.so.367.57</code>); The
NVENC Video Encoding library provides an interface to video encoder
hardware on supported NVIDIA GPUs.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>The NvIFROpenGL library (<code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/libnvidia-ifr.so.367.57</code>); The
NVIDIA OpenGL-based Inband Frame Readback library provides an
interface to capture and optionally encode an OpenGL framebuffer.
NvIFROpenGL is a private API that is only available to approved
partners for use in remote graphics scenarios. Please contact
NVIDIA at <a href="mailto:GRIDteam@nvidia.com" target=
"_top">GRIDteam@nvidia.com</a> for more information.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>The NvFBC library (<code class=
"filename">/usr/lib/libnvidia-fbc.so.367.57</code>); The
NVIDIA Framebuffer Capture library provides an interface to capture
and optionally encode the framebuffer of an X server screen. NvFBC
is a private API that is only available to approved partners for
use in remote graphics scenarios. Please contact NVIDIA at <a href=
"mailto:GRIDteam@nvidia.com" target="_top">GRIDteam@nvidia.com</a>
for more information.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>An X driver configuration file (<code class=
"filename">/usr/share/X11/xorg.conf.d/nvidia-drm-outputclass.conf</code>);
If the X server is sufficiently new, this file will be installed to
configure the X server to load the <code class=
"filename">nvidia_drv.so</code> driver automatically if it is
started after the NVIDIA DRM kernel module (nvidia-drm.ko) is
loaded. This feature is supported in X.Org xserver 1.16 and higher
when running on Linux kernel 3.13 or higher with CONFIG_DRM
enabled.</p>
</li>
<li>
<p>Predefined application profile keys and documentation for those
keys can be found in the following files in the directory
<code class="filename">/usr/share/nvidia/</code>: <code class=
"filename">nvidia-application-profiles-367.57-rc</code>,
<code class=
"filename">nvidia-application-profiles-367.57-key-documentation</code>.</p>
<p>See <a href="profiles.html" title=
"Appendix&nbsp;J.&nbsp;Application Profiles">Appendix&nbsp;J,
<i>Application Profiles</i></a> for more information.</p>
</li>
</ul>
</div>
<p></p>
<p>Problems will arise if applications use the wrong version of a
library. This can be the case if there are either old libGL
libraries or stale symlinks left lying around. If you think there
may be something awry in your installation, check that the
following files are in place (these are all the files of the NVIDIA
Accelerated Linux Graphics Driver, as well as their symlinks):</p>
<pre class="screen">
    /usr/lib/xorg/modules/drivers/nvidia_drv.so
    /usr/lib/xorg/modules/libwfb.so (if your X server is new enough), or
    /usr/lib/xorg/modules/libnvidia-wfb.so and
    /usr/lib/xorg/modules/libwfb.so -&gt; libnvidia-wfb.so

    /usr/lib/xorg/modules/extensions/libglx.so.367.57
    /usr/lib/xorg/modules/extensions/libglx.so -&gt; libglx.so.367.57

    (the above may also be in /usr/lib/modules or /usr/X11R6/lib/modules)

    /usr/lib/libGL.so.367.57
    /usr/lib/libGL.so.1 -&gt; libGL.so.367.57
    /usr/lib/libGL.so -&gt; libGL.so.1

    (on GLVND-based installations, libGL.so.1 from GLVND may be used instead
    of libGL.so.367.57 as shown above.)

    /usr/lib/libnvidia-glcore.so.367.57

    /usr/lib/libcuda.so.367.57
    /usr/lib/libcuda.so -&gt; libcuda.so.367.57

    /lib/modules/`uname -r`/video/nvidia.{o,ko}, or
    /lib/modules/`uname -r`/kernel/drivers/video/nvidia.{o,ko}
</pre>
<p>If there are other libraries whose "soname" conflicts with that
of the NVIDIA libraries, ldconfig may create the wrong symlinks. It
is recommended that you manually remove or rename conflicting
libraries (be sure to rename clashing libraries to something that
ldconfig will not look at -- we have found that prepending "XXX" to
a library name generally does the trick), rerun 'ldconfig', and
check that the correct symlinks were made. An example of a library
that often creates conflicts is "/usr/lib/mesa/libGL.so*".</p>
<p>If the libraries appear to be correct, then verify that the
application is using the correct libraries. For example, to check
that the application /usr/bin/glxgears is using the NVIDIA
libraries, run:</p>
<pre class="screen">
    % ldd /usr/bin/glxgears
        linux-gate.so.1 =&gt;  (0xffffe000)
        libGL.so.1 =&gt; /usr/lib/libGL.so.1 (0xb7ed1000)
        libXext.so.6 =&gt; /usr/lib/libXext.so.6 (0xb7ec0000)
        libX11.so.6 =&gt; /usr/lib/libX11.so.6 (0xb7de0000)
        libpthread.so.0 =&gt; /lib/tls/libpthread.so.0 (0x00946000)
        libm.so.6 =&gt; /lib/tls/libm.so.6 (0x0075d000)
        libc.so.6 =&gt; /lib/tls/libc.so.6 (0x00631000)
        libnvidia-tls.so.367.57 =&gt; /usr/lib/tls/libnvidia-tls.so.367.57 (0xb7ddd000)
        libnvidia-glcore.so.367.57 =&gt; /usr/lib/libnvidia-glcore.so.367.57 (0xb5d1f000)
        libdl.so.2 =&gt; /lib/libdl.so.2 (0x00782000)
        /lib/ld-linux.so.2 (0x00614000)
</pre>
<p>In the example above, the list of libraries reported by
<span><strong class="command">ldd</strong></span> includes
<code class="filename">libnvidia-tls.so.367.57</code> and
<code class="filename">libnvidia-glcore.so.367.57</code>: this
is because <span><strong class="command">glxgears</strong></span>
links <code class="filename">libGL.so.1</code>, which in this case
is the legacy, non-GLVND NVIDIA GLX client library. When
<code class="filename">libGL.so.1</code> is provided by GLVND
instead, <code class="filename">libGLX.so.0</code> and <code class=
"filename">libGLdispatch.so.0</code> should appear in the output of
<span><strong class="command">ldd</strong></span>. If the GLX
client library is something other than the NVIDIA or GLVND
<code class="filename">libGL.so.1</code>, then you will need to
either remove the library that is getting in the way or adjust your
dynamic loader search path using the <code class=
"envar">LD_LIBRARY_PATH</code> environment variable. You may want
to consult the man pages for <span><strong class=
"command">ldconfig</strong></span> and <span><strong class=
"command">ldd</strong></span>.</p>
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